Caboolture Watch House murals fostering connection

Caboolture Watch House murals fostering connection

New murals on the Caboolture Watch House pay tribute to the region’s First Nations people and serving police dogs in the district.

The western side of the wall is home to First Nations art designed and painted by James Doyle, a proud Kabi Kabi, Butchulla, Lardill, Ungarri Iman Murdi (man), who lives locally.

His painting tells a number of stories and relates to restoring values and respect among all cultures and uniting the Moreton community as one.

James believes it’s important to teach culture, educate and strengthen young people, because they are the next generation.

“It is very important that crucial information that helps and supports youth through their life and provides them with their identity is passed from generation to generation,” James says.

On the eastern side of the wall, artist Fiona Groom has captured the Moreton District’s five serving police dogs - Luger, Crash, Reaper, Beau and Gator.

Watch the video

Fiona says she likes to create emotion, reaction and narrative in her work.

“The natural world, but mainly animal life, is what inspires and informs me on what direction I need to take, and as the composition slowly comes to life, this new painting has established itself with its own story, its own response to evoke and a sentiment that lingers on,” she says.

Professionally, Fiona’s activities have included exhibitions in a variety of state and national arts festivals as well as group shows, including exhibitions in Florence, the US and Scotland.

The final piece in the installation is Karbul, a shimmering serpent from which Caboolture takes its name.

See the gallery

Karbul is the First Nations name for carpet snake and ‘ture’ is the home or place where something lives.

Karbul was designed, created and installed by Amaroo Landscaping.

Caboolture Station has always had a resident carpet snake, which had to find a new home when the old station was demolished.

On the day of the Watch House opening, it made an appearance at the neighbouring building, just in time for photos.

Superintendent John Hallam says the murals and sculpture turned a stark wall into a place for community learning and acknowledgement.

“It is a privilege to have the artwork upon a QPS building,” Superintendent Hallam says.

“We are honoured to be able to showcase these beautiful pieces to the public.”

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